Mark Horning
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In 1967, two groups (The Temptones with lead singer Daryl Hall and The Masters with lead singer John Oates) were performing at the Adelphi Ballroom in what could be described at the time as the dicey part of Philadelphia. When gunfire rang out between rival gangs attending the concert, the two lead singers made it to the building’s service elevator at the same time.

On the ride down they found that they each had interest in the same music and both attended Temple University. Soon, they began hanging out together and eventually sharing various apartments around the city. Two years later they formed their musical duo and five years after meeting signed with Atlantic Records for the release of their debut album after John returned from an extended stay in Europe.

To their credit they have sold an estimated 40 million records with six #1 Billboard hits including: “Rich Girl,” “Kiss on My List,” “Private Eyes,” “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do),” Maneater” and “Out of Touch.” They reached the peak of their fame in the late 70s to mid 80s and were named ‘the most successful duo of the rock era” by Billboard Magazine. They have a total of seven RIAA Platinum Albums and six RIAA Gold Albums. They have been inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame (2003) and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (2014) and last year received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

It is no mystery as to how the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio was nearly filled to capacity when Daryl Hall and John Oates took the stage and how the audience stood from the opening notes of a cover of the Mike Oldfield song “Family Man" clear to the last song of the five super hits encore when they closed the show with “Didn’t I (Blow Your Mind this Time).” In all, the dynamic duo presented 15 of their greatest hits along with their cover of the Righteous Brothers “You’ve Lost that Lovin’ Feeling.” Fans were entertained with renditions of “Maneater,” “Out of Touch,”  “Did It in a Minute,” “Say It Isn’t So,” “One on One,” “She’s Gone,” “Sara Smile,” “Wait for Me,” “Is it a Star,” “I Can’t Go For That,” with a selection of encores including “Rich Girl,” “Kiss on My List,” “Private Eyes,” “You Make My Dreams” and their final song.

Interspersed with the songs were videos and a bit of stage patter that made the show extremely entertaining. Everyone sang along with their favorite songs and there were a bunch of them. The audience was well behaved and receptive, especially to the two opening acts of Allen Stone who opened the night as a single man on a stool with a guitar who dazzled the crowd with his songs and technique; and Tears For Fears who have racked up enough hits of their own to have audience members saying…”Oh yea, I remember that song.” In spite of the huge area inside the arena the sound technicians managed to fill the space with sound that was evenly distributed and not monstrously loud. Many in the audience hope for a return of Hall and Oates in the near future to the Rock and Roll Capital of the World.


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