Billy Idol announces 2019 Las Vegas residency at Palms Casino
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What better spot in America than Sin City to hold a “White Wedding?” Las Vegas seems to be the perfect landing spot for Billy Idol, who announced his upcoming residency at the city’s Palms Casino Resort on Monday. The residency is set to begin early next year with a run of shows in January, and picking up again nine months later for five additional performances in October, making for a total of 10 shows by the end of fall 2019.

Idol’s residency will begin with scheduled shows on Jan. 18-19, 23 and 25-26 of next year. Fans should get ready to hear plenty of classic hits from Idol’s catalog that span from his Generation X beginnings to his solo career. These include radio favorites like "Rebel Yell," "White Wedding," and "Dancing With Myself.” Idol will be backed by his normal rock band for all of the performances, which includes guitarist Steve Stevens. Fans may even hear some of the newer tunes from Idol’s last studio effort, 2014’s Kings & Queens of the Underground.

Vegas seems to be the place where both current and former pop artists are finding success in the live side of the industry as a healthier alternative to touring and life on the road. James Taylor announced recently that he’ll be holding his own Vegas residency at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace this coming spring. Aerosmith, Lady Gaga, Carlos Santana and Mariah Carey have all announced or extended their own Vegas residencies in recent months, making the southern Nevada city quite the hot-spot for music-based entertainment. The current musical landscape in the famous city certainly contrasts with Vegas' notorious history of being tailored more towards leisurely lifestyles of high stakes gambling, golfing, prize fighting and over-the-hill lounge singers.

Fans who won't be able to make it out to Vegas to catch Billy Idol next year can catch the punk rocker when he comes to Denver's Paramount Theatre tomorrow night (Sept. 19). Tickets for the show can be purchased by clicking here