Ryan Smith
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“This song’s a love song, you can dance to it if you like,” said Alex Story of Doyle just before the band ripped into “Some Kinda Hate.” The group, led by Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein (current/former guitarist of the Misfits), may be his namesake, but their show at Big Shots in Valparaiso, Ind. on Tuesday demonstrated that it was far from a one-man show. Vocalist Story, who has been with Doyle since the Gorgeous Frankenstein days, held his own onstage with Doyle through a panoply of hits from Doyle’s and the Misfits’ catalog, with highlights like “Where Eagles Dare,” “Skulls,” and “Cemeterysexxx.”

Prior to Doyle’s set at 10:30, no less than six bands opened up for the headliners, and all but one (Element A440) were local bands. Element definitely made an impression with their unusual blend of synth metal. They had the look and sound of gothic industrial metallers, with a frontman possessing a chilling stare and strange flourishes like eerie masks and eye makeup; but it was their potent and alluring sound that made the biggest impression. As a band, they reside visually and musically somewhere in the neighborhood of Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson, but beyond having a similar aesthetic they were no copycats.

Strangely enough, shock punk cult figure GG Allin loomed large over the evening. Frontman from local grindcore outfit Handsome Prick was sporting an Allin shirt and band the Sluts performed a cover of Allin’s “I Wanna F*** Myself.” The lead singer of the Sluts made an impression by stripping down to his boxers for some reason while the lead singer for alt/emo/punk outfit Steel City Hearts also made a sartorial impression with a punkish version of a suit.

Overall, there was a nice diversity of the bands’ styles during the evening. Doyle’s and the Misfits’ music has its own unique qualities, a sort of blend of punk and metal. All of the openers fit within that type of dark and heavy aesthetic, ranging from grindcore to industrial, to straight up punk and metal; which was a good choice to keep the attention of Doyle’s diverse fan base.