One year after Uganda trip, French Montana's health center is helping over 300,000 people
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One year ago, French Montana visited the African country of Uganda after spotting a group of children via YouTube who dance in the streets for food and money with a tattered environment behind them. It reminded the rapper, whose real name is Karim Kharbouch, of his own upbringings in his home country of Morocco before moving to South Bronx, N.Y. Montana sought out the children who go by Triplets Ghetto Kids to feature them in his video "Unforgettable." Being an advocate for universal health care, he poured financial efforts into the Suubi Health Care Center and one year later, the center is able to help over 300,000 people.

Denis Muwanguzi of the center posted via social media the success and French Montana screen capped the post and added his own words for his own social media (see his Facebook post below). "It's been exactly one year today when French Montana visited Suubi Hospital. I remember him saying, 'I will do what I can to help out.' Those words have been in form of global advocacy for universal health coverage and financial support for Suubi," Muwanguzi wrote. "Our impact was at 56,000 people and we are currently covering 300,000," he continued.

"Happy one year anniversary to my family in Uganda. [I] can't believe we got so much done in one year! Thank u for the opportunity [sic]," French Montana tweeted regarding the $100,000 donation he made to the health center.

As noted, Montana discovered the children while surfing YouTube and picked up on the videos that went viral. He was so struck by Triplets Ghetto Kids talent and flew 30 hours to meet the children and learn about their stories. TGK all live together with the man who found them all separately due to different individual circumstances and despite having been dealt a rough hand of cards, TGK remain happy with the only thing they know - art. Montana filmed his music video "Unforgettable" with friend Swae Lee of Rae Sremmurd and the children. The song became Montana's first top 10 hit in the U.S. in July 2017.

Additionally, following his trip to Uganda, he created the documentary titled "Project: Unforgettable 'My Story, Their Reality.'" The documentary highlighted the tough living quarters of the nine children along with Kavuma, the man who took in the children.

French Montana then brought their talent to the U.S. by purchasing them all passports including three adult chaperones at the tune of $100,000. The children would them perform with Montana at the 2017 BET Awards.

Montana's experience has inspired him to be vocal about health care. "Heath care is kind of a privilege right now but it needs to be a right. When it comes to humanity I feel like I a lot of people gotta step up to make it better," he told CNN. "I feel like a lot of artists and a lot of actors and people that have a platform like mine don't like to touch them kind of subjects because they real risky," he continued, stressing to take action on the subjects instead of merely talking about them.

Since Montana's trip to Uganda, he has partnered with Global Citizen to launch his own Unforgettable Health Care Campaign which has received hundreds of thousands of dollars including a $100,000 donation by The Weeknd.