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Train played that song again in Cleveland yesterday.

And all those other ones, too.

Singer Pat Monahan and his “Meet Virginia” cohorts from the Golden State returned to Cavs Town for an exclusive sunset performance last night at Jacob’s Pavilion.

The band added the surprise concert to its already-packed itinerary to compensate Ohio fans disappointed by sound issues at their gig Saturday at Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, where a power outage apparently spoiled the P.A. mix for lawn-sitters.

The make-up show was “free” to anyone with a paid lawn ticket from the 6/24 Blossom event, but admission to the 5,000-capacity outdoor amphitheater in Cleveland’s Flats District was first-come, first-served.

We’re guessing at least a third of eligible ticke-tholders turned out for the encore engagement; the riverside venue was nearly filled.

Train publicists put word out Tuesday via social media that fans could queue outside the Nautica venue starting at 4pm Wednesday. 

The Blossom bungle wasn’t the band’s fault to begin with: They played a full show and never knew about the technical difficulties until later. Which only made Monahan’s motion to double-back for another go-round (after a show in Cincinnati) that much classier.

“We apologize,” said the singer, who’s fronted the group since 1993.

“We’d have been disappointed sitting out on the grass, too. So we thought about how we could solve it. We hope you have as much fun tonight as you would've had the other night!”

Monahan and other band members have friends and family in Northeast Ohio, which may have strengthened their resolve to do right by their Buckeye constituents.

They didn’t skimp, either: Train delivered a full set (minus duets shared Saturday with tour-mates OAR and Natasha Bedingfield)—starting with the electrifying lead-in of Prince and The Revolution’s “Let’s Go Crazy.” They brought all their lights and LCD backdrops, too. They just had to cram it all onto Nautica’s narrower stage.

From the bleachers, the arched screens made the stage resemble the top of a vintage jukebox.

The ensemble followed with “Drink Up” from its new album, A Girl A Bottle A Boat, before dipping into the past with “50 Ways to Say Goodbye” (from 2012’s California 37) and “If It’s Love” (from the multiplatinum 2009 effort Save Me, San Francisco). Monahan—buzz-cut and comfy in black pants and T-shirt—paced back and forth while belting on “Get to Me,” “Calling All Angels,” and “Meet Virginia,” pausing only to check in with the other musicians or high-five fans down front.

Those fans got in on the action, too: The diverse crowd sang along with the bigger hits, giving back everything Monahan gave on “Drive By” and “Marry Me.”

Late-set highlights included “Mermaid,” a medley of cover-snippets by Ed Sheeran (“Shape of You”) and Sia (“Cheap Thrills”), “Lost and Found,” and Train’s ubiquitous, ukulele-powered “Hey, Soul Sister.” The confetti-canon finale included recent single “Play That Song,” Queen’s “Under Pressure,” and 2001 smash “Drops of Jupiter.”

Kudos to Monahan and the gang for doubling down on behalf of Sunday’s Blossom audience, giving up a night off to make sure they remember Train for this intimate, awesome June 2017 bash rather than a decibel-dampened mishap.

Local troubadour Ray Flanagan opened at 8pm with a batch of acoustic-guitar powered goodies from his forthcoming solo debut (he’s the point man for the harder-rocking Authorities band, who issued albums in 2014 and 2015).

Vocally, Flanagan sounded like a cross between Don McLean and a young Michael Stipe—but he kind of looked like Cat Stevens, circa 1975.